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  #1  
Old 04-21-2006, 06:29 AM
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Default Candle Burning

I'm not sure this project would work or not, so before you make this your science experiment, make sure to do some research!

The question is, does the temperature affect how quickly a candle burns. Actually, you can just say does temperature affect the rate of combustion.
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Old 04-21-2006, 07:31 PM
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Well, I tried and found out that after freezing the candle for some time and then burning it, it burns more slowly.

So according to me, when two chemicals react, their molecules have to collide with each other with sufficient energy for the reaction to take place. This is collision theory. The two molecules will only react if they have enough energy. By heating the mixture, you will raise the energy levels of the molecules involved in the reaction. Increasing temperature means the molecules move faster. This is kinetic theory. If your reaction is between atoms rather than molecules you just substitute "atom" for "molecule" in your explanation.
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Last edited by sciencefreak; 04-21-2006 at 07:34 PM..
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Old 04-22-2006, 11:35 AM
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Well, here, let's talk about what happens when you burn a candle.

First of all, the solid becomes a liquid wax, which you often see near the wick. But then, what truly fuels the fire is the liquid wax that turns into the gas, so the main fuel is actually the gas. When you think about it, a cold candle would burn slower, cause you need more heat to melt the wax then vaporize the liquid wax.
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Old 04-23-2006, 02:36 AM
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To make it simpler for the younger users:

An interesting thing about a candle is that it is a very good example of the four states of matter. The four states of matter are Solid, Liquid, Gas, and Plasma. Wax, the fuel source of a candle goes through all four of these states of matter.

Let's see what happens when we light a candle. We need a catalyst to start the whole thing going, so we touch a flame to the end of the wick. At first the wick itself starts to burn. The flame creeps down the sides of the wick and usually diminishes until it touches the wax. This is when the mechanism starts to work. The heat from the flame melts the wax surrounding the base of the wick directly beneath it. By the principle of capillary action the melted wax is drawn into the wick providing fuel for the flame which bursts to life.

The candle continues to burn through an ongoing cycle. Wax in a solid state of matter is melted by the heat of the flame and converts it to a liquid state of matter. The liquid wax is drawn up to the tip of the wick inside the flame. At this stage the liquid wax is heated even more and it vaporizes changing into a gaseous state of matter. The gaseous wax enters the combustion area of the flame and is converted to energy. The energy conversion gives off heat, which melts more of the solid wax. The cycle repeats itself until the wick no longer functions due to consumption or lack of fuel for the flame.
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The Newtons and friends were taking tea
Beneath the boughs of an apple tree,
When a falling fruit landed on the
Head of the head of the family.
Mrs. Newton cried, 'Well deary me!
That could've caused an injury'.
But clever Isaac alone could see,
The situation's true gravity.

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  #5  
Old 08-15-2006, 02:18 AM
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Default

[QUOTE=dreamerofeternity]I'm not sure this project would work or not, so before you make this your science experiment, make sure to do some research!

The question is, does the temperature affect how quickly a candle burns. Actually, you can just say does temperature affect the rate of combustion.[/QUOT
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  #6  
Old 10-10-2006, 01:00 PM
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Default Strange expirement

why did he put that? any way the candle expirement should be tested at least 3 times but i do agree on how the temperature of the candle can effect the time period of which it burns up.
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  #7  
Old 10-13-2006, 10:09 AM
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Yes, at LEAST 3 times. Real-life scientists do the same project over probably thousands of times to prove that it is correct!

I say probably 5 times.

~RaZoR~
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  #8  
Old 10-13-2006, 12:58 PM
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Default Yeh

I do think Razor and I r the only ones that talk back. Does anyone even talk at all?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?
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