All Science Fair Projects  

Science Project Forum

   
Welcome to the Mad Scientist's Forum! Join thousands of other students who've received help from the Mad Scientist and our science Mentors!
Register first, then post your questions below. Registration takes only 1 minute! Meet the Mad Scientist
Lost your
password?
Go Back   All Science Fair Projects > Get Help for Your Grade 6-8 Science Fair Projects > Earth Science (Grades 6-8)
User Name
Password

Reply  
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 02-13-2006, 03:02 PM
sportyshorty1116 sportyshorty1116 is offline
Trainee Mentor (Team D)
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 3
Rep Power: 0
sportyshorty1116 is helpful, nice and has lots of friends here
Exclamation help me!!!!

i need i project that has to do with water or air pollution.
im stumped. i have no ideas. can i help me by giving me an idea for a science project
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 02-23-2006, 07:50 PM
Caboose38924's Avatar
Caboose38924 Caboose38924 is offline
Mentor
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 168
Rep Power: 14
Caboose38924 is helpful, nice and has lots of friends here
Thumbs up Water pollution project

Here is a project having to do with water pollution. I hope that this helps. Here is the site if you need any more information. Good Luck with the project! ([url]http://scssi.scetv.org/mims/schools/blhs/science/y98/joshm1.htm[/url])

This project was done to learn how much are local bodies of water had been effected by pollution. I predicted that Lake Murray would have the least buffer capacity.

Water samples were collected from three local bodies of water. The samples were collected from Lake Murray, the Saluda River, and Davis Pond. The pH level of the sample was tested, and then polluted with a HCl solution. The change in the pH determined the buffer capacity of the water sample.

Background
Water pollution limits the amount of pure, fresh water that is used for drinking and cleaning. Most pollutants that affect water come from industries, farms, and sewage systems. Natural cycles work to absorb small amounts of wastes in bodies of water. During a cycle, wastes are turned into useful, or at least harmless, substances. Bacteria such as aerobic bacteria use oxygen to decay natural wastes and break them down into chemicals like, nitrates phosphates, and carbon dioxide. These nutrients are then used by simpler organisms. The same cycle also occurs when people pour chemicals into bodies of water; however, if too many chemicals are put into the water the bacteria which breaks down the chemicals uses up too much oxygen and; therefore, leaves the animal and plants with not enough oxygen. Nutrients in the water cause a similar process called nutrient enrichment, or eutrophication to take place. This process increases the growth of algae and the amount at which they die. This again uses more oxygen and deprives plants and animals of it. The addition of heated water also upsets the cycle. The heated water kills plants and animals that are used to living in cooler temperatures.

Purpose
It has always been a concern of mine that local bodies of water might have fallen victim to chemical pollution as a result of dumping or acid rain. My experiment will allow me to determine the amount of buffer capacity if any is in three local bodies of water.


Hypothesis
I believe that because of the large number of people who live and play around the Lake Murray, its buffer capacity will be the lowest.

Materials and Procedure
Glass jars for collecting samples of 200 ml
distilled water
pH meter
medicine dropper
Celsius thermometer
pH buffers for pH 4, pH 7, and pH 10
0.2 M HCl solution
200ml beaker stirring rod
In glass jars collect 200 ml water samples were collected from Lake Murray, the Saluda River, and Davis pond. If solids were present in the samples, they were removed by filtering or by allowing the sediments to settle to the bottom before taking pH readings.
As a control, first the buffering capacity of distilled water was found. To do this, take a 200 ml sample of distilled water and, using the pH meter, measure its pH at 20oC. Using the buret, add the HCl solution one drop at a time until a pH of 4 has been reached. Stir the solution well after each addition of HCl. A period of 30 seconds before reading the pH meter. The number of drops required to reach the desired pH was counted. The figure was recorded
The procedure was repeated for each of the natural water samples. The buffer capacity of each sample was found by subtracting the base number you found in step 2 from the number of drops required for the sample

Results
The pH level of the first water sample from Lake Murray started at 6.10. After one drop of the 0.2 HCl solution was added it dropped to 4.73; with the second drop it fell to 4.14. The third drop fell to 3.82, the fourth drop to 3.60, the fifth to 3.52, and the sixth to 3.48. The total pH difference of the first Lake Murray sample was 2.62. The pH level of the second water sample from Lake Murray began at 6.74, after the first drop it fell to 4.90; the second to 4.09; the third to 3.80; the fourth to 3.65; the fifth to 3.54; and the sixth to 3.45. The total pH difference of the second Lake Murray sample was 3.29.

The pH level of the first water sample from the Saluda River began at 6.50; after the first drop it fell to 5.63; the second drop to 4.24; the third to 3.90; the fourth to 3.71; the fifth to 3.56; and the sixth to 3.45. The total pH difference of the first Saluda River sample was 3.05. The pH level of the second water sample from the Saluda River started at 6.54, after the first drop it fell to 5.80; the second drop to 4.35; the third to 3.88; the fourth to 3.67; the fifth to 3.56; and the sixth to 3.45. The total pH difference of the second Saluda River sample was 3.09. The pH level of the third water sample from the Saluda began at 6.46, after the first drop it fell to 5.24; the second drop to 4.14; the third drop to 3.80; the fourth drop to 3.65; the fifth drop to 3.52; and the sixth drop to 3.41. The total pH difference of the third Saluda River sample was 3.05.

The pH level of the first water sample from Davis Pond started at 6.50, after the first drop it fell to 6.01; the second drop to 4.44, the third to 3.99, the fourth to 3.63, the fifth to 3.52, and the sixth to 3.43. The total pH difference of the first Davis Pond sample was 3.07. The pH level of the second water sample from Davis Pond began at 6.50, after the first drop it fell to 6.14, the second drop to 4.73, the third drop to 3.99, the fourth drop to 3.60, the fifth drop to 3.55, and the sixth drop 3.48. The total pH difference of the second Davis Pond sample was 3.02. The pH level of the third water sample from Davis Pond started at 6.50, after the first drop it fell to 6.31, the second drop to 4.78, the third drop to 3.99, the fourth drop to 3.73, the fifth drop to 3.58, and the sixth drop to 3.45. The total pH difference of the third Davis Pond Sample was 3.05.

The pH level of the control (Distilled Water) began at 6.00, after the first drop it fell to 3.97; the second drop to 3.69; the third drop to 3.54, and the fourth drop to 3.43. The total pH difference of the Control was 2.07.

Conclusion
My conclusion does support my Hypothesis in that Lake Murray had the lowest buffer capacity. The Saluda River had the most buffer capacity.
__________________
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 04:18 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright (C) 2006 All Science Fair Projects.com All Rights Reserved