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  #1  
Old 01-27-2006, 11:27 PM
Mysterious Mysterious is offline
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Default Electrolysis experiment suggestions (do not want to use water or table salt)

Hi I'm planning on doing a science fair experiment on electrolysis but I don't want to split water molecules or do something with potassium and sodium chloride (table salt) because someone else in my class is already doing it . I can't change my topic because I've already done my research and written my report, I just need to do the experiment.

Does anyone have any other ideas that involve electrolysis? Perhaps any other elements or compounds that I can split up using electrolysis? Thanks!

Last edited by Mysterious; 01-27-2006 at 11:38 PM..
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  #2  
Old 02-01-2006, 04:29 PM
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First off, let me just tell you I don't have a full knowledge of electrolysis. So I'll contribute my ideas but you'll have to verify if I'm right.

First of all, if water and salt could be split, shouldn't anything be able to split? Do you know hydrochloric acid? And sodium hydroxide? Actually, you can use any acid or base. All acids have hydrogen. All bases have hydroxides (oxygen and hydrogen). I suppose you have to put an acid/base in water to electrolysis it. You can electrolyze water, compare the porportions of hydrogen and oxygen. Then compare the porportions of oxygen and hydrogen in electrolyzed acid and base. Compare the porportions between acid, base, and water.

Actually, can you give me some background info on electrolysis. I'm interested.
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Old 02-26-2006, 08:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dreamerofeternity
First off, let me just tell you I don't have a full knowledge of electrolysis. So I'll contribute my ideas but you'll have to verify if I'm right.

First of all, if water and salt could be split, shouldn't anything be able to split? Do you know hydrochloric acid? And sodium hydroxide? Actually, you can use any acid or base. All acids have hydrogen. All bases have hydroxides (oxygen and hydrogen). I suppose you have to put an acid/base in water to electrolysis it. You can electrolyze water, compare the porportions of hydrogen and oxygen. Then compare the porportions of oxygen and hydrogen in electrolyzed acid and base. Compare the porportions between acid, base, and water.

Actually, can you give me some background info on electrolysis. I'm interested.
Could this be a 9th grade project?
Does water electrolysis works in tap water or distilled water? if not tell me something that is a 9th-12th grade project on water electrolysis.
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Old 03-16-2006, 11:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bert
Could this be a 9th grade project?
Does water electrolysis works in tap water or distilled water? if not tell me something that is a 9th-12th grade project on water electrolysis.
distilled works best
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Old 03-16-2006, 11:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dreamerofeternity
First off, let me just tell you I don't have a full knowledge of electrolysis. So I'll contribute my ideas but you'll have to verify if I'm right.

First of all, if water and salt could be split, shouldn't anything be able to split? Do you know hydrochloric acid? And sodium hydroxide? Actually, you can use any acid or base. All acids have hydrogen. All bases have hydroxides (oxygen and hydrogen). I suppose you have to put an acid/base in water to electrolysis it. You can electrolyze water, compare the porportions of hydrogen and oxygen. Then compare the porportions of oxygen and hydrogen in electrolyzed acid and base. Compare the porportions between acid, base, and water.

Actually, can you give me some background info on electrolysis. I'm interested.
Electrolysis is a Chemical change, especially decomposition, produced in an electrolyte by an electric current. The word electrolysis means the process of breaking molecules to smaller components by using an electric current. Positive and negative poles of a DC electric source such as a battery can absorb opposite ions of an electrolyte causing separation of ions and creation of a new substance.
Electrolytes dissolve by dissociation. That is when the molecules of a substance break down into charged particles called ions. An ion with a negative charge is called an anion because it is drawn through the solution to the positive charge on the anode. A particle with a positive charge is called a cation. It moves through the solution to the cathode. Water has its solvent properties because it is polar. The molecule has charged ends (+ and -). These charged ends react with charges on other polar substances to dissolve them. They do so by taking hydrogen atoms from the substance to form hydrogen ions.
Some uses for electrolysis military.. As well as producing hydrogen, electrolysis also produces oxygen. Nuclear submarines are able to generate breathing oxygen from the water around them. This enables submarines to stay underwater for an indefinite period of time. Space Stations can also use electrolysis to produce amounts of extra oxygen from waste water or surplus water produced from the Space Shuttle fuel cells. Both these applications depend on having an abundant electrical supply, either from the reactor or solar panels.
A list of uses for electrolysis for industries.
Manufacture of aluminum, lithium, sodium, potassium, and aspirin.
Manufacture of hydrogen for hydrogen cars and fuel cells.
High-temperature electrolysis is also being used for this.
Coulometric techniques can be used to determine the amount of matter transformed during electrolysis by measuring the amount of electricity required to perform the electrolysis.
Manufacture of chlorine and sodium hydroxide.
Manufacture of sodium and potassium chlorate.
Manufacture of per fluorinated organic compounds like trifluoroacetic acid.


First law of electrolysis
In 1832, Michael Faraday reported that the quantity of elements separated by passing an electrical current through a molten or dissolved salt was proportional to the quantity of electric charge passed through the circuit. This became the basis of the first law of electrolysis.
Second law of electrolysis
Faraday also discovered that the mass of the resulting separated elements was directly proportional to the atomic masses of the elements when an appropriate integral divisor was applied. This provided strong evidence that discrete particles of electricity existed as parts of the atoms of elements.


A list of uses for electrolysis for industries.
Manufacture of aluminum, lithium, sodium, potassium, and aspirin.
Manufacture of hydrogen for hydrogen cars and fuel cells.
High-temperature electrolysis is also being used for this.
Coulometric techniques can be used to determine the amount of matter transformed during electrolysis by measuring the amount of electricity required to perform the electrolysis.
Manufacture of chlorine and sodium hydroxide.
Manufacture of sodium and potassium chlorate.
Manufacture of per fluorinated organic compounds like trifluoroacetic acid.
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Old 03-16-2006, 04:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bert
Could this be a 9th grade project?
Does water electrolysis works in tap water or distilled water? if not tell me something that is a 9th-12th grade project on water electrolysis.
I'll tell you why tap water is hard to be electrolysized. There are ions in tap water, such as fluoride. Where would they go? So use distilled water.

Actually, it'll be interesting to check out the difference between distilled water and tap water electrolysis.

Do you know about trying to obtain hydrogen for powering hydrogen cars? One of the main problems is how to get the hydrogen. Since you need to split water using electrolysis, and electrolysis takes up electricity, which is another fuel by itself, how do you obtain the hydrogen without adding more pollution to the air? So water releases two hydrogen. You can ask the question, what compound is the quickest (takes the less electricity) to electrolyze, something that is more efficient than water. (Also, since water needs energy to be distilled, why not use another source?)

Good luck!
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Old 04-19-2006, 02:40 PM
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Default 8th grade submarine project?

Does anyone have any ideas for how to build a submarine that will float, submerge, and float again?
I have to build one by the end of next week and do not know how- I have NO idea on this one other than it may involve the use of baking soda?

Please help me on this if you can! Thank you and GOD bless.
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  #8  
Old 04-19-2006, 10:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shadowmancer
distilled works best
Actually, it doesn't... That's because distilled water does not have free ions and so it can't be split easily. That's the reason why a little acid is added to distilled water to produce the fusion in ions.
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Old 04-19-2006, 10:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mysterious
Hi I'm planning on doing a science fair experiment on electrolysis but I don't want to split water molecules or do something with potassium and sodium chloride (table salt) because someone else in my class is already doing it . I can't change my topic because I've already done my research and written my report, I just need to do the experiment.

Does anyone have any other ideas that involve electrolysis? Perhaps any other elements or compounds that I can split up using electrolysis? Thanks!
You could try electroplating. It's based on the principle of electrolysis and its a really cool experiment. Here's how it goes:

What is electroplating?

Electroplating is the deposition of a metallic coating onto an object by putting a negative charge onto the object and immersing it into a solution which contains a salt of the metal to be deposited. The metallic ions of the salt carry a positive charge and are attracted to the part. When they reach it, the negatively charged part provides the electrons to "reduce" the positively charged ions to metallic form.

Demo:

For the first demonstration, the cathode is copper (the pennies), the anode is zinc, and the electrolyte (solution) is a zinc salt dissolved in vinegar and water.

One source of zinc is the shell of conventional carbon-zinc batteries (make sure not to use alkaline batteries like Duracell or Eveready Energizers, nor rechargeable nickel-cadmium batteries, but the cheap 1-1/2 volt AA, C, or D plain carbon-zinc batteries). The science teacher can cut up such batteries and remove the black glop, and give the student the clean zinc. An alternative source is zinc anodes available from any boating store. A final option is to sand down a modern U.S. penny until the copper surface is removed and the underlying zinc substrate is exposed.

For the pennies you wish to plate onto, any pennies will do, but if you start with a dull brown penny, you'll end up with a dull zinc plated penny. So, try to find shiny new pennies for best results. Immediately before plating, clean it with toothbrush and toothpaste, or a gentle scouring powder like Bon Ami or Multiscrub. Rinse well after cleaning, but use plastic gloves so you do not get fingerprints or other soils on the penny after cleaning.

A transparent plating container is best, a Pyrex beaker is excellent; but if not available, a Pyrex dessert bowl can serve well.

A recipe suggested by Tom Pullizzi, and retested by Ted Mooney and found to work is:

Fill the container about half way with vinegar, but measure how much vinegar that is. Put the zinc anode into vinegar and let it sit for several hours, allowing some of it to dissolve. We'd like to shoot for 100 g/l of dissolved zinc, although the vinegar probably will not support that much dissolution.

Add 100 g/l of Epsom Salts
and 120 g/l of table sugar.

Connect one flashlight battery (1-1/2 volts) to the penny and the zinc, and place them into the solution. Don't let them touch each other. With luck, within a few minutes you'll begin to get a bright silvery coating. Ted didn't have quite that much luck when he tried it, but did find that a reapplication of the toothbrush and toothpaste quickly polished the thin greyish coating to a fairly bright shine.
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The Newtons and friends were taking tea
Beneath the boughs of an apple tree,
When a falling fruit landed on the
Head of the head of the family.
Mrs. Newton cried, 'Well deary me!
That could've caused an injury'.
But clever Isaac alone could see,
The situation's true gravity.

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Old 04-25-2006, 03:08 PM
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Lightbulb

i think if you have the a small bit of copper pipe in the solution, and then connect the positive and negitave terminals to those, the negitive copper eventualy wears down and the positive copper grows! i think it has to be in a copper oxide solution, im not sure, ill have to look it up.
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