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-   -   Chemistry:What is the Effect of an Ice Cube Shape on Melting Time (http://classroom.all-science-fair-projects.com/forum/showthread.php?t=2545)

dogstar 10-19-2006 02:09 PM

Chemistry:What is the Effect of an Ice Cube Shape on Melting Time
 
I need to find(quickly) how I am supposed to go through with this experiment. I need to figure out how I should carry out this experiment. What I have so far:

Purpose:
To find how the shape of an ice cube affects its melting time.

materials:
1.cube-shaped ice container
2.rectangle-shaped ice container
3.cresent-shaped ice container
4.half-a-sphere-shaped ice container
5.a small measuring spoon
6.4 plastic cups
7.a measuring cup
8.a log book

hypothisis:
The rectangle-shaped ice cube will melt the slowest because its surface area is the most.

RaZoR 10-19-2006 02:11 PM

Put it in the room all next to eachother. Freeze them for the same time. Let them melt all the way, monitoring them the whole time. Then write in your log book what happens!

Polishdude59 10-19-2006 05:00 PM

Take each ice cube put it in the same tempatutre water and time how long it takes for it to melt and record it in ur little stratagey guide.

~poland pwns~ :D

P.S I know im da bom :cool:

RaZoR 10-20-2006 07:05 PM

Actually. That's not how it goes. Putting it in water makes it melt.

demonchick6667 10-25-2006 10:56 AM

uh....so putting it in water makes it melt?
awesomness...:bat:

dogstar 11-06-2006 06:40 AM

Ok
 
I have an idea. I COULD put it on a china plate, where it is exosed to the same air temp, and everything. If I use a cup, the ice would melt, and cool the air, and the air would be inclosed, cooling the ice. This would affect its melting time, and I don't want that. So, where its exposed, I can easily expose it to the same air temp.

RaZoR 11-06-2006 06:40 AM

It has to be semi-warm to hot to actually melt.

cloverrerealan@yahoo.com 11-10-2006 09:00 AM

sounds good
 
:star:
Quote:

Originally Posted by RaZoR (Post 10818)
Put it in the room all next to eachother. Freeze them for the same time. Let them melt all the way, monitoring them the whole time. Then write in your log book what happens!

i say you do the same it sounds good to me

dreamerofeternity 01-27-2007 06:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cloverrerealan@yahoo.com (Post 11635)
:star:

i say you do the same it sounds good to me

Hold on a sec:

1) IT DOESN'T MATTER HOW YOU MELT IT! NO MATTER WHAT, IT'LL MELT!
Okay, you put all your ice cubes in water, and they melt, and you observe, and compare which shape melts faster. Or you put it on a plate, let them melt, and compare which shape melts faster. THEY'RE THE SAME! The importance is that ALL THE CUBES ARE IN THE SAME CONDITIONS.

2) What matters is that you make sure each cube has the same amount of water (same mass.) For example, you can't accurately compare a huge rectangular ice cub with a teeny circular cube. Do you understand? You have to make sure they contain the same amount of water, but have different shapes.


3) Sorry to ruin the answer for you, if you were really looking for it. Shapes of ice cubes are related to melting time because of surface area. The more surface area a shape has, the quicker it melts, because it's more exposed to the warmer temperature in the atmosphere around it.

dreamerofeternity 01-27-2007 06:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by demonchick6667 (Post 10997)
uh....so putting it in water makes it melt?
awesomness...:bat:


Ice melts in water because water is at a higher temperature than ice (think about it. the refrigerature is cold, water turns cold-->turns into ice). When the warmth transfers from the water to the ice, the ice melts, and the water becomes colder, until everything reaches equilibrium (same temperature) with the room.

If you put the ice at room temperature, it'll melt the same, just because room temperature is higher than ice temperature (zero degrees Celsius, for that matter.)


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