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brainygirl 03-29-2006 05:24 PM

Hope you guys will have fun finding out the answer!!
 
Why do bubbles form if a glass of water is left alone for a while?

dreamerofeternity 04-22-2006 12:45 PM

Hint: why do bubbles in soda for a while then disappear, and no more bubbles? (Same concept, except more apparent in soda than water)

wisteria 04-25-2006 03:27 AM

hi everyone
 
how are you all? i've been busy...

tricky quwstion Brainy but a good one I have to say ... hmmmmm could it be that the glass has air that it eventually gets filled in with water?:confused:

dreamerofeternity 05-04-2006 02:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wisteria
how are you all? i've been busy...

tricky quwstion Brainy but a good one I have to say ... hmmmmm could it be that the glass has air that it eventually gets filled in with water?:confused:

Not quite...

When you heat up water, little air bubbles will come out of the sides. It's the same reason. Hint: it has something to do with solubility...

smartblond44 06-09-2006 08:31 AM

Hi Im new!! my name is smartblond44!!that is a very good question, I have no idea how that happens!!please tell me how it does happen!hope to see you soon!!!! :D


~Smartblond44~

dreamerofeternity 06-20-2006 04:27 PM

answer to trivia
 
cause as the temperature inceases, the ability of the water to dissolve gases decrease. So less gas could be dissolved in the water. so the gases come out of the water, and you see the bubbles.

for more information, check out solubility curves for gases.

snoopylovable 09-23-2006 04:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by brainygirl
Why do bubbles form if a glass of water is left alone for a while?

Atmospheric gases such as nitrogen and oxygen can dissolve in water. The amount of gas dissolved depends on the temperature of the water and the atmospheric pressure at the air/water interface. Colder water and higher pressure allow more gas to dissolve; conversely, warmer water and lower pressure allow less gas to dissolve.

When you draw a glass of cold water from your faucet and allow it to warm to room temperature, nitrogen and oxygen slowly come out of solution, with tiny bubbles forming and coalescing at sites of microscopic imperfections on the glass. If the atmospheric pressure happens to be falling as the water warms, the equilibrium between gas molecules leaving and joining the air/water interface becomes unbalanced and tips in favor of them leaving the water, which causes even more gas to come out of solution. Hence bubbles along the insides of your water glass. :lightbulb: very inteligent right?

RaZoR 10-11-2006 03:46 PM

Water has a lot of gases in it. Also, as the water is coming out from the pipes, it collects a lot of air. So when left out for awhile, the air has time to come out and make bubbles!


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